Sunday, May 29, 2016

Unofficial Results of the 100th Running of the Indianapolis 500

These are the unofficial results of the 100th running of the Indianapolis 500.

Rookie of the Year candidate (and now, a definite shoo-in), Alexander Rossi of Nevada City, CA left Formula 1 racing to become an IndyCar rookie. He has done what no other rookie has done since Helio Castroneves in 2001, and won the Indianapolis 500.

1. Alexander Rossi, 200, Running
2. Carlos Muñoz, 200, Running
3. Josef Newgarden, 200, Running

4. Tony Kanaan, 200, Running
5. Charlie Kimball, 200, Running
6. J.R. Hildebrand, 200, Running

7. James Hinchcliffe, 200, Running
8. Dixon, 200, Running
9. Sebastién Bourdais, 200, Running

10. Will Power, 200, Running
11. Helio Castroneves, 200, Running
12. Oriol Servia, 200, Running

13. Marco Andretti, 200, Running
14. Graham Rahal, 200, Running
15. Chilton, 200, Running

16. Hawksworth, 200, Running
17. Tagliani, 200, Running
18. Pippa Mann, 199, Running

19. Pagenaud, 199, Running
20. Chaves, 199, Running
21. Townshend Bell, 199, Running

22. Brabham, 199, Running
23. Clauson, 198, Running
24. Ryan Hunter-Reay, 198, Running

25. Pigot, 195, Running
26. Takuma Sato, 163, Contact
27. Mikhail Aleshin, 126, Running

28. Conor Daly, 115, Contact
29. Stefan Wilson, 106, Mechanical
30. Buddy Lazier, 99, Mechanical

31. Ed Carpenter, 95, Mechanical
32. Sage Karam, 93, Contact
33. Juan Pablo Montoya, 64, Contact




You can find my books Branding Yourself (affiliate link), No Bullshit Social Media, and The Owned Media Doctrine on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Books-A-Million, or for the Kindle or Nook.

Takuma Sato Hits the Wall After Catching Dirty Air

Takuma Sato of A.J. Foyt Racing got them to wave the yellow flag after he hit the wall. Without too many people around him, he either ran into some marbles or caught some dirty air. Either way, he got loose and just veered over to the wall, smacked it, and steered safely down the straightaway. He managed to make it back to the pit, and they're looking at his car.

This was a lucky break for Helio Castroneves in the #3 Pennzoil car, because he had sustained some damage to the left rear wing after some minor contact. He was able to pit during Sato's yellow, get the rear wing assembly replaced, and get back out onto the track on the lead lap.

Castroneves is currently in 21st, and Sato is in 25th.

Ed Carpenter's #20 Car Has Retired

Ed Carpenter's #20 Fuzzy's car has retired from the race. That's what you say when a car is dropping out. It doesn't mean Ed is retiring from racing, it just means he's done today.

Ed completed 98 laps before going out for mechanical issues, and currently sits in 31st place. His teammates JR Hildebrand and Josef Newgarden are still out on the field, running 6th and 3rd respectively.

Buddy Lazier is also currently out for mechanical reasons, but no word has come down on whether he's out.



Townsend Bell Takes Out Ryan Hunter-Reay in the Pits

Just as I was writing about the Aleshin/Daly accident in turn 2 (lap 114), drivers came in for a needed pit. We've dealt with unsafe departures from the pit, and this one was the worst.

From what we could see, Townsend Bell was attempting to leave the pits and avoid Ryan Hunter-Reay, when he nearly collided with Helio Castroneves to his right (the right lane is considered the fast lane in the pits, and cars leaving their pit area need to be in the left lane). When he nearly collided with Castroneves, he swerved back over, and was T-boned by RHR, who was just departing the pit area.

Since the driver on the left has ben the one penalized for being unsafe, Bell has been assessed a stop-and-go penalty. He must enter the pit, stop, and then leave again. Since the top speed of Pit Road is 60 mph, this will be painful.

Bell and RHR managed to get back in and are running 25th and 26th respectively. Expect Bell to drop back further after his penalty.

Turn 2 Claims Two More Victims, Aleshin and Daly

Turn 2 claims two more victims, #7, Mikhail Aleshin (Schmidt Peterson with Pelfrey Racing) and #18, Conor Daly (Dale Coyne Racing). Turn 2 may need a little tightening because Aleshin got loose with no one around him, spun around backward, and hit the wall.

As his tires created a fog of smoke, Daly's car emerged from the fog, took some evasive maneuvers to avoid Aleshin's spinning wreck, overcorrected, and got loose himself. He looks like he made a little contact with the rear of his car to Aleshin's car.

The day is over for both men. Both drivers had finished 114 laps and sit 27th and 28th.






You can find my books Branding Yourself (affiliate link), No Bullshit Social Media, and The Owned Media Doctrine on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Books-A-Million, or for the Kindle or Nook.

In 30 years, we'll have the 100th CONSECUTIVE Running of the Indy 500

The reason the 100th Running and the 100 year anniversary of the Indianapolis 500 are on two separate dates is because of World War I and World War II. Owing to the war, a lack of drivers and mechanics, as well as the need to conserve resources and fuel for the war effort, the 500 was not run in 1917, 1918, 1942, 1943, 1944, or 1945.

Those missing six years meant that we celebrated the 100 years of the first race in 2011, and we're celebrating the 100th running — the more important date, I think — this year.

But, if the Indianapolis Motor Speedway wants to capitalize on another century mark, they should mark the 100th Consecutive in 30 years, in 2046.

Sage Karam Reaches 4th Place, Smacks the Wall

Sage Karam, driving the #24 car for DRR-Kingdom Racing, made a hard hit on the wall in turn 2. He was trying to pass Townsend Bell going into turn 2. He got too high, got out of the groove, got loose, and BAM!, he stuck it in the wall.

Karam was making a risky move, trying to pass when he was on the outside, and that was the end of his day. He completed 93 laps, and even at this point, is sitting in 30th place, ahead of Montoya (contact), Carpenter (who's in the pits with car trouble), and Lazier, who's currently 41 laps behind the Karam, thanks to a stuck throttle and late start.





You can find my books Branding Yourself (affiliate link), No Bullshit Social Media, and The Owned Media Doctrine on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Books-A-Million, or for the Kindle or Nook.

Juan Pablo Montoya Hits the Wall, is Out on Lap 64

Defending Indianapolis 500 champion, Juan Pablo Montoya, put the #2 Verizon car into the wall. From the looks of the replay on TV, something just appeared to break or the rear end got loose, and JPM started to slide. He took his hands off the steering wheel, and waited for the ride to end.






You can find my books Branding Yourself (affiliate link), No Bullshit Social Media, and The Owned Media Doctrine on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Books-A-Million, or for the Kindle or Nook.

Power, Kanaan Make Contact in Pit Row

In the clown show of Pit Row, cars coming in, cars going out, contact was inevitable. Will Power and Tony Kanaan made a little contact, and Kanaan managed to clip the wall. He's still running, and it's being reported that the incident is under review. Kanaan is still driving, but a ruling is expected soon.

UPDATE: Power was found to be the unsafe driver, and was made to go to the very back of the field.

Also, driver Buddy Lazier is back out, has completed 9 laps, and was just assessed a pit penalty. Oriol Servia was also assessed a pit penalty as well.

Hinchcliffe and Hunter-Reay Changing Leads 25 times in 25 laps

At 25 laps, Ryan Hunter-Reay and James Hinchcliffe have changed the lead 24 times. RHR has led for 12 laps, and Hinchtown has led for 13.









You can find my books Branding Yourself (affiliate link), No Bullshit Social Media, and The Owned Media Doctrine on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Books-A-Million, or for the Kindle or Nook.

Buddy Lazier Back to Gasoline Alley, Failed to Start

1996 Indy 500 winner Buddy Lazier had problems from the outset, and didn't even start the Indianapolis 500. His throttle was sticking right from the start, so they've rolled his car back to Gasoline Alley. Not sure if he'll be able to make an appearance in the race at all.

When I was a kid, the race would easily take 3 or 4 hours, and a trip back to Gasoline Alley could still see you back out on the course. Nowadays, it means you're done.

Diane from IMS says he could still come back out, but Natalie says they haven't heard anything official yet.



You can find my books Branding Yourself (affiliate link), No Bullshit Social Media, and The Owned Media Doctrine on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Books-A-Million, or for the Kindle or Nook.

My Interview with Stefan Wilson, brother of Justin Wilson, at the 100th Running of the Indianapolis 500

Stefan Wilson, brother of Justin Wilson, at the Indianapolis 500 Media Day 2016, held this past Thursday. I had a chance to interview him and eavesdrop on another interviewer's questions.

Justin Wilson was my favorite IndyCar driver, and was always fun to interview. He was the first driver I ever interviewed at the Indy 500, and he was such a gentleman. He was patient, answered my questions, and had a nice conversation with me. He died on August 23, 2015 during the race at Pocono. During the interview, Stefan got to talk about his experiences at the track and what it was like to grow up watching Justin race.










You can find my books Branding Yourself (affiliate link), No Bullshit Social Media, and The Owned Media Doctrine on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Books-A-Million, or for the Kindle or Nook.